New Sheffield homeowners should consider security

Nigel Fisher

Nigel Fisher

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Home security is low on the agenda of priorities for most people when it comes to moving house, a new study has revealed.

But a decent bus network close by, and being close to good friends are seen as much more important.

The number one issue for all is being able to park outside the house easily, while the second biggest concern is the council tax banding.

Two thousand adults who moved home recently were questioned about the factors that preoccupy their thoughts when changing their address.

Surprisingly, home security was extremely low on the list...below considerations such as what types of supermarkets are nearby and how much decorating is required.

Nigel Fisher, MD of home security specialist Yale, that conducted the study said: “We weren’t expecting home security to be the first thing on people’s minds when moving house, but it has come much lower in the top 50 list than we’d have predicted.

“On the one hand it is reassuring that ‘what the local crime rates are like’ has appeared in the top 10, as this would suggest some level of concern about safety.

“But we would always advise checking out the local neighbourhood for signs of well-maintained buildings. In addition, check door locks are up to insurance standards, and check windows and front doors for signs of break-ins.”

Broadband speed is a key consideration for a third of those polled.

A further 48 per cent want to know how noisy neighbours are likely to be, while the ‘class’ of neighbours is important to 22 per cent.

Twenty-three per cent don’t want a property that has young children living next door.

The distance to the nearest supermarket and also the chain of local supermarkets matters to many, as does the proximity to the doctors’ surgery.

Whether or not a king sized bed will fit in the master bedroom, and ‘if the neighbours can see me sunbathing in the garden’ are further considerations.

How long or short a commute will be, what colour to paint the lounge and whether the sofa will fit through patio doors are all among the top 50 list.

Of 2,000 people polled, 36 per cent admitted they were more preoccupied about where things would go in the new property than home security.

And 16 per cent don’t bother to lock the windows and doors every time they leave the house, while 70 per cent don’t have a burglar alarm.

A further 64 per cent admit they don’t have much outside lighting, 57 per cent don’t have trusted neighbours to watch their property and 73 per cent don’t think to put lights and radios on timers when they go away.

Mr Fisher recommends replacing the locks’ cylinder as a protection.