‘Botox saved my sight’ says Killamarsh woman

Liz Hallis had a cancer cell spotted by Cheryl Barton, director of Aesthetika Clinic, whilst she was having botox, which has since been removed and saved her eye sight. Picture: Andrew Roe
Liz Hallis had a cancer cell spotted by Cheryl Barton, director of Aesthetika Clinic, whilst she was having botox, which has since been removed and saved her eye sight. Picture: Andrew Roe

A hairdresser who had a tumour growing near her eye has said she would have lost her sight – if it hadn’t been for botox.

Liz Hallis said her tumour – known as a ‘rodent ulcer’ – was spotted by nurse Cheryl Barton when she went for cosmetic surgery just over one year ago.

Liz Hallis had a cancer cell spotted by Cheryl Barton, director of Aesthetika Clinic, whilst she was having botox, which has since been removed and saved her eye sight. Picture: Andrew Roe

Liz Hallis had a cancer cell spotted by Cheryl Barton, director of Aesthetika Clinic, whilst she was having botox, which has since been removed and saved her eye sight. Picture: Andrew Roe

Following Cheryl’s advice to get seen by a doctor, Liz underwent surgery to remove the tumour.

She has now spoken out to thank Cheryl, as the tumour would have eventually caused her to go blind.

Liz, 62, of Killamarsh, said: “I am so grateful to Cheryl. She told me to get to the doctors straight away, no messing about.

“If it hadn’t been for her I wouldn’t have been to see the doctor and would have lost the sight in my left eye.”

Liz Hallis had a cancer cell spotted by Cheryl Barton, director of Aesthetika Clinic, whilst she was having botox, which has since been removed and saved her eye sight. Picture: Andrew Roe

Liz Hallis had a cancer cell spotted by Cheryl Barton, director of Aesthetika Clinic, whilst she was having botox, which has since been removed and saved her eye sight. Picture: Andrew Roe

Liz said she first noticed the rodent ulcer in 2007.

She said it initially looked like a burst capillary underneath her left eye and did not cause her any concern.

While the growth did become more prominent over the years, Liz said the tumour was ‘hardly noticeable’ and she remained unconcerned.

But after visiting Cheryl in 2014, the magnitude of the tumour soon became 
apparent.

Liz Hallis had a cancer cell spotted by Cheryl Barton, director of Aesthetika Clinic, whilst she was having botox, which has since been removed and saved her eye sight. Picture: Andrew Roe

Liz Hallis had a cancer cell spotted by Cheryl Barton, director of Aesthetika Clinic, whilst she was having botox, which has since been removed and saved her eye sight. Picture: Andrew Roe

Liz said: “Cheryl suspected it was a rodent ulcer and told me the risk of it causing blindness, not to mention the facial disfigurement from operating.”

Liz went to see her GP and was referred to eye specialists at Chesterfield Royal Hospital.

She underwent surgery in November 2014.

Earlier this month Liz went to see Cheryl for the first time since being told to seek medical attention.

Liz Hallis had a cancer cell spotted by Cheryl Barton, director of Aesthetika Clinic, whilst she was having botox, which has since been removed and saved her eye sight. Picture: Andrew Roe

Liz Hallis had a cancer cell spotted by Cheryl Barton, director of Aesthetika Clinic, whilst she was having botox, which has since been removed and saved her eye sight. Picture: Andrew Roe

Cheryl, cosmetic nurse at Aesthetika Clinic, in Sheffield, said: “Liz put her arms around me and said ‘thank you for saving my sight’. It was an emotional moment.”

Liz is now urging anyone who suspects they might have a rodent ulcer to seek medical attention 
immediately.