Flood firm donates to Carlisle clean-up

Graham Wild and Granville Stenton, of Rubber Safety Hygiene, pack cleaning equipment which is being donated to the flood victims in the Carlisle. Picture: Andrew Roe
Graham Wild and Granville Stenton, of Rubber Safety Hygiene, pack cleaning equipment which is being donated to the flood victims in the Carlisle. Picture: Andrew Roe
0
Have your say

A Sheffield company is donating cleaning equipment to flood victims in Carlisle - after it suffered the same fate in 2007.

Fourteen people were plucked from the roof of Rubber Safety Hygiene by helicopter after the Don broke its banks and engulfed the premises on Princess Street, Attercliffe on June 25.

It took 12 months and cost £700,000 to get back to normal, according to managing director Robert Hand.

So when he saw the devastating flooding that hit Carlisle this week he had a “reasonable degree of empathy.”

He responded to an appeal by Radio Sheffield to donate supplies to the stricken town.

The 30-strong company, now based on Hunsley Street, Brightside, donated two pallets of equipment, worth £2,000, including 400 pairs of gloves, 200 mops, buckets, disposable cloths and masks.

A lorry owned by Sheffield company DBL Logistics will deliver it to householders facing a huge clean-up job after record-breaking rainfall in Cumbria when Storm Desmond hit the UK.

Mr Hand said: “I remember when the company was flooded, it was devastating. We were cleaning up every night for three months - but at least I had a home to go to, where I could shower and get changed and sleep.

“It was bad enough it was the business, it’s nothing like having your home flooded.

“It’s a dirty horrible job you wouldn’t wish on anyone. The aftermath was disgusting due to contamination, you need the right protective gear.”

In June 2007, RSH staff witnessed the waters rising until 4pm when it flooded into the building. Some 3m litres were later pumped out of the cellar.

Mr Hand said they were winched into the helicopter in pairs and all 14 were safely taken to what was then Sheffield City Airport.

In Cumbria, a major incident was declared after thousands of homes were flooded, forcing many families in Lancashire and Cumbria to evacuate.