Office block to complete Heart of the City project

Heart of the City: The third office block at the corner of Norfolk Street and Charles Street

Heart of the City: The third office block at the corner of Norfolk Street and Charles Street

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The final piece in Sheffield’s Heart of the City jigsaw - a ten-storey office block - could be about to fall into place.

Plans have been submitted to the council for a 78,000ft development of Grade A office space at the corner of Norfolk Street and Charles Street.

Already two office blocks have been built and occupied as part of St Paul’s Place, and a third was always envisaged to complete the set.

The latest building is designed to complete property developer CTP’s programme that started in 2005 - and also the council’s broader Heart of the City project that was devised in the run-up to the millennium and included the Peace Gardens, Millennium Gallery and St Paul’s Hotel.

CTP director David Topham said it was part of a drive “to bring the best of building design and office specification to Sheffield, comparable with the best in the UK”. He added: “Our programme is to start construction next year. We anticipate that the business community of Sheffield as well as inward investors will welcome this new office space.”

The latest scheme comprises nine storeys of offices above two shops or restaurants. Already there is a ramp to a basement car park.

It is hoped occupiers will be tempted to follow the footsteps of law firm DLA, which has taken offices in the first office block, and the Government’s Department for Education, which relocated from Moorfoot into the second.

It is thought public funds will be sought to help get the project off the ground, and that the council will be asked to give its support for what is seen as a significant development for the city centre.

Heart of the City, based on a masterplan by London-based architecture and urban planning practice Allies and Morrison, was always seen as a catalyst for the regeneration of the city centre.

It started the ball rolling, but the momentum was halted as a result of the recession.