Cottages will evoke memories of WWII

1940's Group members Dave Sanilands (left) and Hazel Glossop (fourth left), of the 1940s Group, are pictured with Manor Village Group members, from left, Barry Stacey, Elaine Stacey, Susan Nixon and Dot Slingsb in the living history centre.
1940's Group members Dave Sanilands (left) and Hazel Glossop (fourth left), of the 1940s Group, are pictured with Manor Village Group members, from left, Barry Stacey, Elaine Stacey, Susan Nixon and Dot Slingsb in the living history centre.
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Cottages illustrating life in Sheffield during World War Two are due to open early next year - and they will contain many exhibits from the former Traditional Heritage Museum in Ecclesall Road.

Items ranging from a fireplace and washtubs to packets of cornflower have been donated for the attraction at Manor Lodge by the University of Sheffield, which closed its small museum two years ago.

They will form part of ‘WWII Living History Cottages’ which are under construction on the lower part of the Manor Lane site and will give the public and schools a glimpse of a Sheffield traditional home in 1942.

Due to follow over three years is the recreation of ‘Manor Castle Village’, using the university’s collection of traditional shops including a corner shop, chemist’s, cobbler’s, a pawn shop, an opticians and a Pollards coffee shop.

“All the shops would have been on the site apart from Pollards,” said Sue France, chief executive of Green Estate, the social enterprise that manages the Manor Lodge complex, which is growing from an attraction based around the Tudor tower and now has a discovery centre, farm, artists’ studios and cafe. It joined Heritage Open Days last Saturday.

The cottages are being financed by £100,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund and Viridor Landfill Credits, and the second phase is dependent on £400,000 being secured from sources including the lottery, which has already approved the scheme in principle. Volunteers will run the attractions.

Other exhibits from the Traditional Heritage Museum, which was run by Prof John Widdowson before it closed because of concerns over the structure of the building, near Hunters Bar, have gone elsewhere. Several hundred objects have gone to Sheffield Industrial Museums Trust at Kelham Island to be incorporated into the Little Mesters Street exhibit and the Ken Hawley tool collection.

Transfers have been made to 33 specialist collections such as at the Sheffield Fire and Police Museum, South Yorkshire Transport Museum and Chesterfield Museum.

Some household items are now with a local nursing home where they will be used for reminiscence therapy.

University Director of Library Services Martin Lewis, said: “The project team’s meticulous work has enabled over 90% of the Traditional Heritage Museums’s collections to find new homes. In many cases this material will be more accessible, and will be available to be enjoyed by more people than was the case when they were housed at the museum.”