Police urge caution over release of tragic Hillsborough images

File photo dated 15/04/89 of police helping fans over the fencing during the Hillsborough football disaster. An online petition calling for ministers to release Cabinet papers about the Hillsborough football disaster hit 100,000 signatures tonight - enough to trigger a debate in Parliament. Press association Photo. Issue date: Tuesday August 23, 2011. Footballer Joey Barton led a campaign on Twitter that swelled the number of supporters adding to the calls for the release of all documents about Margaret Thatcher's discussions on the 1989 tragedy in which 96 Liverpool fans died in a crush. See PA story POLITICS Hillsborough. Photo credit should read: PA Photos/PA Wire

File photo dated 15/04/89 of police helping fans over the fencing during the Hillsborough football disaster. An online petition calling for ministers to release Cabinet papers about the Hillsborough football disaster hit 100,000 signatures tonight - enough to trigger a debate in Parliament. Press association Photo. Issue date: Tuesday August 23, 2011. Footballer Joey Barton led a campaign on Twitter that swelled the number of supporters adding to the calls for the release of all documents about Margaret Thatcher's discussions on the 1989 tragedy in which 96 Liverpool fans died in a crush. See PA story POLITICS Hillsborough. Photo credit should read: PA Photos/PA Wire

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SOUTH Yorkshire Police chiefs have agreed to the disclosure of all documents relating to the Hillsborough disaster - but are calling for distressing images of victims not to be made public.

Temporary Deputy Chief Constable Andy Holt spoke out after the Government agreed that all its documents - including cabinet minutes - should be handed over to the independent panel overseeing the release of papers into the public domain.

The Government gave the go-ahead after a debate in the House of Commons triggered by a petition on the Downing Street website, which 140,000 people signed.

DCC Holt said: “The force, and me personally, are committed to the maximum possible disclosure of all the documents in its possession regarding the Hillsborough tragedy.

“We recognise the pain and hurt suffered by the families and friends of the victims and it’s our aim to help them achieve the best possible understanding of the events as they unfolded on that dreadful day.

“But in so doing, we want to do all we can to minimise any future harm to those families and friends by ensuring that, through the Hillsborough Independent Panel, we work with the families to ensure any distressing images or sensitive details are not placed into the public domain for all to see.

“I have come to gain some understanding of the continuing anguish and grief felt by relatives and friends of those who died.

“I hope that by releasing the documents we’ll be able to gain a greater understanding of what happened on that day, but I have to say I’ve yet to see any evidence of a systematic cover-up as alleged by some.

“It’s my hope that when the full details are released that it will provide some understanding and comfort for those who still suffer.”