Day a hurricane whirled in

Residents of Skye Edge Avenue get a roof over their heads as workmen lay tarpaulin to protect their hurrican ravaged homes Feb 17th 1962

Residents of Skye Edge Avenue get a roof over their heads as workmen lay tarpaulin to protect their hurrican ravaged homes Feb 17th 1962

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A NATIONAL disaster zone was declared, The Queen was briefed, Prime Minister Harold Macmillan sent a telegram with his “sincere condolences, the Lord Mayor launched an appeal fund and Richard Dimbleby brought his BBC TV Panorama team.

Sheffield was hit by a hurricane 50 years ago next Thursday.

Author Neil Anderson with Dave Manvell and John Firminger with copies of his new book about 1970's shopping and the Limit in Sheffield

Author Neil Anderson with Dave Manvell and John Firminger with copies of his new book about 1970's shopping and the Limit in Sheffield

In little more than four hours, three people were killed, 98 houses destroyed and almost two-thirds of buildings were damaged as winds of up to 96 mph tore through the city.

Hardly a street escaped the havoc, and hundreds of people were left homeless. Many prefabs lost their roofs.

Civil defence teams and Royal Engineers were drafted in, and private builders adopted a wartime emergency footing under the guidance of the council in a race against time to make almost 6,000 homes watertight. Insurance staff worked overtime.

Particularly badly hit were the Attercliffe, Crookes and Heeley areas but all parts of the city took a hit. The BBC team headed for Skye Edge and Arbourthorne.

Hurricanes - Northern Avenue, Arbourthorne

Hurricanes - Northern Avenue, Arbourthorne

Five days earlier, Sheffield had suffered what was considered a severe gale when 3,000 houses were damaged in what was seen as a freak squall.

Then came worse, with the full force being felt at around 5am on February 16, 1962.

“The winds got worse as the night went on,” recalls Dave Manvell, who was 13 at the time and in bed at home in Crookes.

“Power lines were flashing and it was so noisy that all the family got up and sat drinking tea. I remember mum saying it was just like the Blitz. As daylight came, you could see all the devastation. Chimney stacks were down and bits of roof were missing.

“When I walked to school, everywhere was covered in broken chimney pots.”

He found the school, in Western Road, closed. “I found out later that part of the roof had broken off.

Dave, who now lives in Ecclesall, added: “For years afterwards in Weston Park Museum, the wind chart records displayed the highest gusts of wind.”

The youngest fatality was 17-year-old John William Johnson, of Colwall Street, Attercliffe, who died in his bed. Rescuers including his dad, a neighbour and two police officers could not get to him because part of the upstairs floor had collapsed.

Vicar’s wife Shirley Hill, aged 30, died after being trapped in her Brightside home by a falling chimney and Ida Stabbs, aged 57, was killed in bed in Crookes. A fourth person, Edward Wadsworth, of Shafton, Barnsley, who was hit by falling masonry, died later in the Royal Infirmary.

Why was Sheffield the worst hit? Only a few miles away, the winds were less than 20mph.

It is thought the hurricane was caused by air being lifted over the high ground of the Peak District, then being compressed through the city’s valleys.

Minister of Housing Charles Hill came to Sheffield to see the destruction for himself, and the Government later lived up to its promise of helping with the massive repair bill.

“Sheffield’s misfortune has given us one of those rare and unpleasant opportunities of seeing nature’s experiment in action,” said the Minister.