Family of Sheffield schoolboy with debilitating illness raise charity cash

A charity fun day in Shiregreen has raised more than �2,500 for the Perthes Association
A charity fun day in Shiregreen has raised more than �2,500 for the Perthes Association

Family of a Sheffield schoolboy who is suffering with a debilitating illness have raised more than £2,500 for a charity which helps youngsters with the condition.

Ashton Borden, of Shiregreen, spent five months limping and complaining of hip pain before he was diagnosed with Perthes Disease in August 2014.

Ashton Borden, of Shiregreen, with the final amount raised

Ashton Borden, of Shiregreen, with the final amount raised

The seven-year-old lost movement in his hip and underwent treatment in hospital and now faces a two-year wait to see if he needs more operations.

His family decided to raise awareness of the Hartley Brook Primary pupil’s illness by organising a charity fun day outside their homes in Shiregreen.

The event, on Torksey Road and Torksey Road West, also raised £2,564 for the Perthes Association, which provides mobility aids for youngsters, as well as supporting families and funding research into finding a cure.

The family fun event featured a bouncy slide, live music, a raffle, various stalls and games.

A charity fun day in aid of the Perthes Association

A charity fun day in aid of the Perthes Association

Ashton’s grandma Joyce Burgin said: “We raised an amazing £2,564.36 and were overwhelmed with the turnout and support from our community and local businesses.

“We would like to make a special thank you to both Sheffield United and Sheffield Wednesday, Buy To View, Concord Sports Centre, Co-operative Food, the Royal Oak pub in Pitsmoor and its customers, Places for People and the many more local businesses whose generosity and donation were beyond our expectation.

“Also a big thank you to each individual who opened up their heart to this great cause and donated, participated and supported us to achieve this outstanding amount.

“This community never fails to exceed expectations and beyond.”

She added: “Perthes disease effects a lot of children. It involves blood that doesn’t flow properly to the leg, but until the child is in pain or limping no-one knows they have it.

“Every specialist treats it slightly different because they know so little about it.

“We have to wait at least two years until we know the blood has found another way into his leg. If not, it will result in a lot more operations. At his last X-ray they found that he hadn’t got any worse.

“Sometimes he needs a wheelchair to get about, but the NHS don’t pay for these. Ashton was lucky because as a family we clubbed together to get him one, but other children aren’t as fortunate.”