First World War soldiers from South Yorkshire laid in final resting place

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France.

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France.

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One hundred years after they were killed in action, the remains of four South Yorkshire soldiers who fought in World War One have been laid to rest.

The servicemen’s bodies were among 15 found around the Beaucamps Ligny area of northern France in 2009 during construction work.

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France.

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France.

Using DNA tests on samples provided by their surviving relatives, the Ministry of Defence managed to formally identify 11 of the soldiers, including the four men from South Yorkshire.

They are Private John Brameld, born in Sheffield, Privates John Willie Jarvis and Ernest Oxer, both born in Rotherham, and Pte Walter Ellis, born in Doncaster.

Now all 15 fallen soldiers have been re-interred following a special ceremony in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in northern France.

The moving service was attended by Army reservists from the 4th Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, known as the 4 Yorks, local French townsfolk, and emotional relatives of the servicemen - including the great granddaughter of Private John Brameld, Amanda Walker.

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France.

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France.

Pte Brameld was born in Sheffield in 1884 and followed the family trade as a grinder in the cutlery industry before enlisting with the York and Lancaster Regiment on January 7, 1903.

He joined the reserves in February 1906 and was mobilised immediately when war was declared.

Pte Brameld’s regiment encountered an enemy force vastly superior in numbers in Beaucamp Ligny in October 1914. The battalion suffered substantial casualties with 93 wounded and 34 killed in action.

Speaking at the ceremony, Amanda said: “It’s been one of the best days of my life even though it’s been a sad day. I feel so sad for his wife and children, that they have gone to their graves never having known he had been found. Today has been a privilege.”

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France

The 4 Yorks provided the bearer and firing party during the service, which was conducted by the regimental padre the Reverend Ben Norton, while music was provided by the Band of the Yorkshire Regiment.

The Lord Mayor of Sheffield, Coun Peter Rippon, also attended the re-interment and read a poem at the beginning of the ceremony.

He said: “It is brilliant that so many of the relatives of the men who died have been traced, and that the soldiers have a final resting place.”

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France.

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France.

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France.

One hundred years after they were killed in action the remains of fifteen British soldiers from the York and Lancaster Regiment were re-interred in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Y-Farm Cemetery in Bois-Grenier, Northern France.