Candlelight vigil for the homeless

Dawn Harris of Grace Tebbutt House, who provide shelter and support for vunerable women and Sam Pryor of The Cathedral Archer Project, who support Sheffield's homeless and vunerably housed with the Lord Mayor of Sheffield Cllr Sylvia Dunkerley and Consort John Dunkerley during the Candlelight Vigil at Sheffield Cathedral on Sunday
Dawn Harris of Grace Tebbutt House, who provide shelter and support for vunerable women and Sam Pryor of The Cathedral Archer Project, who support Sheffield's homeless and vunerably housed with the Lord Mayor of Sheffield Cllr Sylvia Dunkerley and Consort John Dunkerley during the Candlelight Vigil at Sheffield Cathedral on Sunday

CHARITY bosses, city leaders and residents gathered for a candlelit vigil to raise awareness of the work of three Sheffield organisations - after they were featured in TV show Secret Millionaire.

Homeless support charity the Cathedral Archer Project, women’s shelter Grace Tebbutt House and Gleadless Valley Community Forum were each handed tens of thousands of pounds by undercover philanthropist Chai Patel.

After watching a screening of the Channel 4 show, staff and supporters of the three Sheffield charities held a vigil in the Cathedral forecourt.

In the programme former Priory owner and self-made multi-millionaire Dr Patel posed as a retired GP volunteering with the organisations.

During an emotional week living in a council house in Gleadless, he came into contact with some of the most vulnerable people in Sheffield. At the end of the programme Dr Patel broke cover, revealing his true identity, and made donations totalling £90,000 - as well as giving Gleadless Valley Forum a new minibus.

The community forum, which helps more than 600 elderly people, received £20,000 for staff, and a minibus to help transport its members on days out and to activities.

Nether Edge-based Grace Tebbutt House, which is facing closure as its council funding is cut, got £25,000 for a fundraising manager. And the Archer Project got £45,000 for medical care and to pay the salary of support worker Sam Pryor.

The money is not nearly enough to keep the charities going and bosses hope the publicity will give them a fundraising boost and increased profile.