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Sheffield people split on fizzy drink tax debate

Fizzy drinks should be taxed, fast food outlets near schools limited and new parents given specific advice on how to feed their children properly to help tackle spiralling levels of obesity, an influential medical group has demanded.

Fizzy drinks should be taxed, fast food outlets near schools limited and new parents given specific advice on how to feed their children properly to help tackle spiralling levels of obesity, an influential medical group has demanded.

SHEFFIELD people are split down the middle in the national debate as to whether fizzy drinks should be heavily taxed in a bid to tackle spiralling obesity levels.

Following a report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, doctors argued unhealthy foods should be handled more like cigarettes, with junk food advertisements banished until after the 9pm TV watershed.

Dozens took to The Star’s Twitter and Facebook pages to voice their opinions.

“The cost of living is high enough without a fizzy drink tax,” said Louise Reed.

Mel Randall agreed. “Almost everything is okay in moderation. People should take responsibility for themselves and keep the Government out of it.”

Claire Gleeson said: “Better education is key. Parents need to cook, and stop feeding their children processed food.”

But others agreed with doctors’ advice, arguing something needs to be done about Britain’s ballooning waistlines. Kate Raynor said: “Why not? It’s a strain on the NHS and if we tax cigarettes and alcohol, I think a tax on low-nutrition, high-fat, high-sugar food is sensible.”

Recommendations

* A ban on advertising foods high in saturated fat, sugar and salt before 9pm.

* Further taxes on sugary drinks to increase prices by at least 20 per cent.

* A reduction in fast food outlets near schools and leisure centres.

* A £100m budget for interventions such as weight-loss surgery.

* No junk food or vending machines in hospitals, where all food must meet the same nutritional standards as in schools.

* Food labels to include calorie information for children.

Do you think tax on fizzy drinks should be increased?

Email: letters@thestar.co.uk

 

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