Sheffield University students helping to save lives of blood cancer victims

Students at Sheffield University celebrate another successful year of recruiting people as potential donors on the Anthony Nolan register.

Students at Sheffield University celebrate another successful year of recruiting people as potential donors on the Anthony Nolan register.

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Students in Sheffield are celebrating are recruiting 684 potential bone marrow donors over the last year.

The University of Sheffield students volunteered at recruitment clinics, aimed at increasing the number of names on the Anthony Nolan bone marrow register.

Blood cancer charity Anthony Nolan has announced new statistics showing that their UK-wide network of student volunteer groups now recruit one in five people who go onto donate their bone marrow or stem cells.

Jemma Mickleburgh, president of the Sheffield Marrow group of student volunteers, said: “Sadly a lot of myths surround the donation process and many people don’t realise how easy it is.

“To sign up, all you have to do is fill out a simple form and spit in a tube. If you’re called up to donate it’s virtually pain free and just like giving blood.

“At Sheffield Marrow we are so proud of how many selfless students are signing up to the register to give people with blood cancer a chance for survival.

“These students are a prime example showing that young people do care and make a real difference in the world.”

Around 2,000 people in the UK need a bone marrow or stem cell transplant each year.

Anthony Nolan uses its register to match potential bone marrow donors to blood cancer patients.

Marrow is a student volunteering group which works with the Anthony Nolan charity to recruit potential donors and raise funds.

Since it’s formation in 1997, Marrow has recruited 66,727 potential donors nationally and nearly 700 have gone onto donate.

The Sheffield group has raised over £4,000.

One volunteer, Emily Heywood, who is studying Medicine at the University of Sheffield, donated bone marrow in 2014.

Charlotte Connolly, from the Anthony Nolan charity, said: “What Sheffield Marrow have achieved is fantastic and we’re really excited to work with them in the year ahead to help us cure more people from blood cancer. Young people are most likely to be chosen to donate so Marrow’s work is key to helping us save more lives.

“Whether it’s spreading the word, recruiting or fundraising, together they make such a big difference, it’s an incredible thing.”