DCSIMG

Kids give Sheffield community centre a facelift

Teenagers taking part in the National Citizen Service scheme are busy decorating the Duke Street Community Centre. Our picture shows some of the youngsters involved in sprucing up the centre.

Teenagers taking part in the National Citizen Service scheme are busy decorating the Duke Street Community Centre. Our picture shows some of the youngsters involved in sprucing up the centre.

Teenagers donned overalls and grabbed their paintbrushes to renovate a Sheffield community centre.

A group of youngsters from Sheffield United FC’s National Citizenship Service programme chose to renovate and redecorate Duke Street Community Centre in Park Hill.

Young people aged 15 to 17 take part in the programme, which is put on by organisations across the country, every year.

Teenagers in school years 11 and 12 spend a month together learning skills, building confidence and lending a hand at community groups.

The government-funded scheme is being delivered by several Sheffield organisations including Sheffield United and Sheffield Wednesday FCs.

It comprises a week spent in the countryside, a week living in university accommodation and a period of organising and delivering a social action project.

The pupils from Meadowhead, Westfield and All Saints schools, were given a budget of £250 to spend on paints and materials for the community centre.

But to make their money go further they visited several stores and asked for donations.

Team leader Ian Oxborough, aged 25, said: “The community centre was very run down and needed somebody to come in and repaint it.

“It’s used by young people as well as for Zumba classes and older people play dominoes and chess.

“But it hadn’t been redecorated in 15 years and people were starting to be put off using it.”

The youngsters then learned vital work skills while overhauling the centre.

Mr Oxborough added: “The group renovated it in two days. They did a full deep clean, including the kitchen, carpets and furniture.

“They bought four leather chairs, and bean bags for the kids, and went round the area afterwards with flyers trying to raise awareness of the centre and to get more people to use it.

“I think the majority really enjoyed it and they learned important job skills.

“Some of them rushed into it, but some of them sat back and enjoyed the experience of working nine to five.

“There were tough times and problems they had to overcome.”

 
 
 

Back to the top of the page