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Poppy project in Sheffield schools recalls WW1

Sheffield City Council has donated poppy seeds to schools to plant as part of their WWI anniversary commemorations.

Sheffield City Council has donated poppy seeds to schools to plant as part of their WWI anniversary commemorations.

Poppies will soon be blooming in every school in Sheffield as thousands of pupils do their bit to commemorate the centenary of the outbreak of World War One.

Youngsters at Dore Primary School will be the first to sow their seeds, which are being distributed free of charge over the next few weeks.

More than a million seeds will be planted in all – with the poppies due to bloom in November in time to mark Remembrance Sunday.

The scheme has been organised by the city council following a donation from Unwins Seeds.

The pupils at Dore were joined by Coun Jackie Drayton, Colonel Geoffrey Norton of the Yorks and Lancaster Battalion and students from Notre Dame, who have been to visit the battlefields in France and Belgium.

Coun Drayton, Sheffield Council cabinet member for children and young people, said: “The centenary is of course something which is historic to all of us, as there is now no-one left who remembers the full horrors of that war.

“But this does not mean it is forgotten. When the seeds flower it will be an incredibly distinctive visual aid and will really bring history to life.

“So many young men and boys lost their lives in the war that its impact lived on for generations.

“The poppies sprang up on the battlefields and became synonymous with the war. If this helps children and young people grasp history and see it come to life before their eyes it can only be a good thing.”

It is intended the poppy campaign will encourage discussion among teachers and pupils about the war, with many younger pupils being introduced to the conflict for the first time.

Schools will also teach children about the struggle over the next four years, to mirror the length of the war.

Shaun O’Connor, history teacher at Notre Dame, said: “Being able to symbolise the war and bring it to life with these poppies is a great way of teaching this period.”

 

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