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Scots in Sheffield unite to honour bard

The Sheffield Caledonian Society has held its annual Burns Night Supper  in honour of the famous poet. The event took place at Tapton Masonic Hall on Saturday (25 January 2014). Our picture shows, from left, Andrew Finney, Douglas and Barbara MacLean, their daugfhter Catriona and son Alan MacLean at the event.

The Sheffield Caledonian Society has held its annual Burns Night Supper in honour of the famous poet. The event took place at Tapton Masonic Hall on Saturday (25 January 2014). Our picture shows, from left, Andrew Finney, Douglas and Barbara MacLean, their daugfhter Catriona and son Alan MacLean at the event.

Scots in Sheffield toasted one of their own as they gathered at a celebration for Scotland’s favourite son Robert Burns.

The 18th century bard was honoured with music, food and a series of toasts at Sheffield Caledonian Society’s annual Burns’ Supper on Saturday – the 255th anniversary of his birth.

Sue Cameron, society secretary, said: “It was a proud night where we gathered to remember a great poet and a great man.

“There are two keynote occasions in the calendar of the Sheffield Caledonian Society – one is St Andrew’s Night, the other is the Burns’’ Supper, held every year on Burns’ birthday.

“On Burns’ Night, the poet is celebrated by the people of his homeland, as well as by ex-pats and appreciative fans all over the world.”

And on the night of tradition, held this year at Tapton Masonic Hall, Scottish food was , of course, firmly in the spotlight, kicking off with the traditional piping of the haggis.’

Sue, aged 62, of Dronfield, said: “The procession is probably the most famous part, led from the kitchen by the toast master, followed by the piper, the chef holding the aggis aloft and then the wine steward with whisky bottles at head height.

“Someone then addresses the Hhaggis before a dagger is plunged into it.

The society was formed in 1822 and fosters relations with people of Scottish descent and those interested in Scottish culture.

Englishwoman Sue – who joined after marrying a Scot – said: “The society has welcomed non-Scots for many years now and, even after my divorce, I’ve remained heavily involved; my love of Burns and the society’s wonderful traditions has not wavered.”

 

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