Move to reassure relatives as Sheffield's last specialist dementia care home sets to close

Hurlfied View is set to close in March 2017
Hurlfied View is set to close in March 2017
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Sheffield’s last remaining specialist dementia care home is to close, city health bosses have confirmed.

Hurlfield View, which provides emergency admissions, carer respite and day care places is to close by March 2017.

Hurlfied View is set to close in March 2017

Hurlfied View is set to close in March 2017

The centre will shut after NHS bosses told Sheffield Council they could no longer carry out the services for next year due to a ‘more and more challenging’ financial situation.

A Sheffield Health and Social Care Trust spokesman said they would try to arrange ‘alternative employment’ for the 60 staff.

Sheffield Council has taken the decision to move to its longer-term strategy for dementia care in the community and away from centres earlier than planned.

The Hurlfield contract was put out to tender in 2015 and was secured by the Trust to run until 2018.

But two months ago, NHS bosses contacted the council to say they could not continue the level of support.

Council bosses say they are confident the places and support will continue elsewhere and plan to invest £450,000 next year to fund services in the city.

The centre provides planned admissions to support service users and carers to help them continue to lead active lives but most admissions are unplanned emergencies due to crises.

Up to four beds are allocated for use by the Dementia Rapid Response and Home Treatment Team to prevent admission to hospital.

Sheffield Health & Social Care Trust chief executive Kevan Taylor

Sheffield Health & Social Care Trust chief executive Kevan Taylor

Two similar centres in Norwood and Crookes were closed in 2012 and 2014.

Joe Fowler, director of commissioning at Sheffield Council, said there is capacity for current users to be transferred elsewhere.

Sheffield has 80 care homes - 52 of them are accredited to deliver similar services to Hurlfield.

“We are confident having spoken to people who use the service that we will be able to provide the continued support that Hurlfield does. People will continue to receive support – this is not a savings plan from the council," Mr Fowler said.

“The money we expected to pay the Trust to deliver services at Hurlfield View next year will be invested in alternative services.”

Trust chief executive Kevan Taylor said: “For some time now Sheffield Council’s plan has been to provide dementia day care and respite services within the community, closer to people’s homes and for it not to be centred around a facility.

“Sheffield Council made this clear prior to issuing the service tender for respite and day care in 2015 and hence the contract period ran only to September 2018.

“Within this time the day care services was to be gradually reduced.

“We are working with Sheffield City Council to support the best interests of both our service users and staff.”