New garden plants seeds for new beginning

gardenCL''Residents in Staveley have welcomed a new communal garden area that's been created to reduce anti-social behaviour.  The garden, located at Devonshire Close, was once a run-down space and often attracted young people who used the area to drink and cause general nuisance to residents.''''Photo: L to R (back row) Jim Russell (Landmark tutor), Cllr Jim McManus, residents Phil Brough and Kelly Ward, Ranger Trevor Haynes.''L to R (front row) Kevin Caudwell (Staveley Hall Garden Centre), Robert Gilpin, Howard Hague, Paul Howlett (Landmark students
gardenCL''Residents in Staveley have welcomed a new communal garden area that's been created to reduce anti-social behaviour. The garden, located at Devonshire Close, was once a run-down space and often attracted young people who used the area to drink and cause general nuisance to residents.''''Photo: L to R (back row) Jim Russell (Landmark tutor), Cllr Jim McManus, residents Phil Brough and Kelly Ward, Ranger Trevor Haynes.''L to R (front row) Kevin Caudwell (Staveley Hall Garden Centre), Robert Gilpin, Howard Hague, Paul Howlett (Landmark students

A COMMUNAL garden has been created in a bid to reduce anti-social behaviour in an area where youngsters used to gather to drink.

Residents in Staveley have welcomed the garden on Devonshire Close, which was once a run-down space that attracted youngsters causing a nuisance.

The garden was created by Chesterfield Council as part of a project which has also seen the nearby council flats improved.

Councillor Jim McManus, of the council, said: “We had made improvements to the flats on Devonshire Close, but realised that the open space wasn’t welcoming or suitable for local residents to use.

“Our local neighbourhood ranger has worked with various partners to transform this area into somewhere that local residents can meet and socialise and children can play safely.

“Residents can now take ownership of the garden and use it to their advantage, either to meet and relax or to grow their own plants.

“We also hope that as more residents make use of the garden it will deter the anti-social behaviour that’s previously been experienced.”

Students from Landmark, a specialist college for young adults with learning disabilities, cleared the site, repaired an old seating area and planted flower beds.