Peak project for ethnic groups from the city

Sheffield City College Black Access Students at Ladybower Dam with the  David Smith,  Fisheries Manager, Ladybower Fisheries.
Sheffield City College Black Access Students at Ladybower Dam with the David Smith, Fisheries Manager, Ladybower Fisheries.
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MEMBERS of ethnic minority groups in Sheffield are being taken to the Peak District to encourage a greater understanding of environmental issues.

In particular, they are involved in a project showing the importance of rivers, lakes, ponds, groundwater and wetlands.

“BME communities and people from deprived white communities live in largely artificial man-made environments considered quite remote from eco-systems services, yet still rely daily on a wide range of these services as sources for food and water,” said Maxwell Ayamba, project manager of Sheffield Black and Ethnic Minority Environment Network.

“This connection is now distant and less immediate and this requires changing individual and social attitudes towards the environment, engendering a better understanding and sustainable lifestyles.”

Latest census figures show that 8.8% of Sheffield’s population are of minority ethnic origin, representing 18 ethnic groups, and the city has the highest influx of refugees and asylum seekers in the UK.

Nearly all of them live in urban areas.

The Peak District scheme is backed by the Peak District National Park Sustainable Development Fund, Trent Rivers Trust, the Salmon and Trout Association and Wincle Fisheries.

First to participate were Sheffield City College Black Access Students and the Schillo Church Congolese Refugee group.