Police chief ‘deeply sorry’ after causing upset over Hillsborough disaster statement

File photo dated 17/03/2008 of Sir Norman Bettison, Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police, who was involved in the discredited South Yorkshire Police investigation after the Hillsborough disaster, said today: "I really welcome the disclosure of all the facts that can be known because I have absolutely nothing to hide." PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Thursday September 13, 2012. See PA story INQUIRY Hillsborough. Photo credit should read: Anna Gowthorpe/PA Wire
File photo dated 17/03/2008 of Sir Norman Bettison, Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police, who was involved in the discredited South Yorkshire Police investigation after the Hillsborough disaster, said today: "I really welcome the disclosure of all the facts that can be known because I have absolutely nothing to hide." PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Thursday September 13, 2012. See PA story INQUIRY Hillsborough. Photo credit should read: Anna Gowthorpe/PA Wire

The Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police has apologised for any upset caused by his statement that Liverpool fans’ behaviour made policing at the Hillsborough tragedy ‘harder than it needed to be’.

Sir Norman Bettison said his role was never to ‘besmirch’ the fans and said the Reds’ supporters were in no way to blame for the disaster.

The chief constable said he was ‘deeply sorry that impression and slight has lingered for 23 years’.

In a statement released yesterday afternoon, Sir Norman said: “Let me speak very clearly. The fans of Liverpool Football Club were in no way to blame for the disaster that unfolded at Hillsborough on 15 April 1989.

“I formed this clear view on hearing all the evidence that was presented at the Taylor inquiry, having sat through every day from its beginning, just four weeks after the tragedy, through to its conclusion.

“The evidence was overwhelming. The police failed to control the situation, which ultimately led to the tragic deaths of 96 entirely innocent people.

“I can be no plainer than that and I am sorry if my earlier statement, intended to convey the same message, has caused any further upset.

“My role was never to besmirch the fans. I did not do that.

“I am deeply sorry that impression and slight has lingered for 23 years.”

Sir Norman was an off-duty South Yorkshire Police inspector when he attended the game and was involved in an internal inquiry held by the force in its aftermath.

Yesterday, he denied any wrongdoing but sparked fury with his comments, which led to calls for him to resign.

Asked if he was part of a ‘black operations unit’ to smear the fans, Sir Norman said: “No not at all, there wasn’t a black ops unit. I wasn’t part of it. I was part of a team trying to put together the facts in a concentrated time period for my chief constable.”

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg said he could see why people were ‘livid’ about Sir Norman’s previous statement.

“I think his comments were ill-judged and insensitive,” the Sheffield Hallam MP said.

“If I was a family on Liverpool, Merseyside, of someone who died on that day, I would be livid.”