Sheffield fundraisers urged to back Children in Need 2015

Celebrities including Dermot O'Leary and Tess Daly are backing the Children in Need
Celebrities including Dermot O'Leary and Tess Daly are backing the Children in Need
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Fundraisers in Sheffield are being encouraged to dress up as their childhood heroes to raise cash for this year’s Children in Need appeal.

Celebrities led by Sir Terry Wogan have got into fancy dress for the 2015 charity campaign, with Sir Terry choosing singing cowboy Gene Autry as his childhood hero.

He said: “I’ve had great fun dressing up as Gene Autry. Please do your bit for BBC Children in Need this year – cast your mind back and dig out your childhood hero for a sponsored dress-up. Every penny of your support will go to make a real difference.”

In South Yorkshire, Children in Need cash is currently funding 58 projects with £2.5m. Among the organisations being supported is the Sheffield Young Carers Project, the Haven House Project supporting youngsters who have experienced domestic abuse and the Football Unites, Racism Divides Educational Trust.

This year’s Children in Need show will be on BBC One on Friday, November 13 and in addition to the fancy dress theme, organisers are also encouraging people to get involved in a range of fundraising activities from bake sales to sponsored walks.

Other celebrities supporting the cause this year include Fearne Cotton, Nick Grimshaw, Tess Daly, Rochelle Humes, Dermot O’Leary and Sophie Ellis-Bextor.

David Ramsden, chief executive of BBC Children in Need, said: “Whatever you do, whether it is a day spent dressed as your childhood hero, a bake sale at work or a ramble with friends it will help BBC Children in Need give children and young people right here in the UK the childhood they deserve.”

Children in Need has raised more than £790 million for children and young people across the UK, with its telethon format starting in 1980 following previous television and radio appeals dating back to the 1920s.

n Visit bbc.co.uk/pudsey.