Sheffield man whose sight was saved to play piano recital

Bill Skipworth, aged 62, had his sight saved by city doctors and is set to play at the Sheffield Royal Society of the Blind's piano recital next month.
Bill Skipworth, aged 62, had his sight saved by city doctors and is set to play at the Sheffield Royal Society of the Blind's piano recital next month.

A man whose sight was saved by doctors at Hallamshire hospital is set to play at the Sheffield Royal Society of the Blind’s piano recital next month.

Bill Skipworth, aged 62, who has been blind in one eye since the age of 50, was rushed to Hallamshire hospital for corrective surgery in July when his vision in his left eye also began to fail.

The operation prevented him from completely losing his vision.

Bill said: “It is absolutely amazing, normally there is a lot of bad press of the NHS but I think they are miracle workers.”

Bill, who has been a client and supporter of the Sheffield Royal Society of the Blind since he started to lose his vision, is set to play at the charity’s piano concert in September.

He will debut six new songs which he has composed especially for the recital.

Bill discovered that since he became blind in one eye, his creative talents on the piano multiplied enormously.

He is helped to compose his music through a neurological condition called Synesthesia, meaning that he sees the keys on a piano as different colours.

He said: “when I am playing something in the C key I see a bright yellow colour, while the F key is like a deep blue and I use this when I compose.”

The concert, which is being held at 1.15pm on September 23 at Sheffield Cathedral, will feature a variety of music including Jazz, Folk and Romantic ballads.

Entry is free but donations are welcome.