Sheffield nurse says farewell after 35 years

Staff and patients at the retirement party for nurse David Ash after 35 years of service

Staff and patients at the retirement party for nurse David Ash after 35 years of service

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A Sheffield nurse who worked on the same ward for more than 30 years dedicating his career to patient care has retired.

David Ash, aged 60, of Scott Road, Pitsmoor, thanked all the patients he cared for and staff he worked with for making his career ‘a joy’.

Nurse David Ash (l) is celebrating his retirement after 35 years of service, with (l-r) Andrew Beechey, clinical director, Marie Watson, urology nurse, Paul Tophill, urology consultant and Martin McClelland, ex consultant

Nurse David Ash (l) is celebrating his retirement after 35 years of service, with (l-r) Andrew Beechey, clinical director, Marie Watson, urology nurse, Paul Tophill, urology consultant and Martin McClelland, ex consultant

David, originally from Nottingham, came to the city to study at the University of Sheffield, said his nursing career came about by complete accident.

“It all started from me looking for a summer job, It was just by chance that I started to help out on a geriatric ward,” he said.

“I liked it so much I decided to train to be a nurse in 1978 – and the rest is history.”

He started working as a male staff nurse in 1980 on the spinal unit at Lodge Moor Hsopital – where he was just one of four male nurses in the 400-bed hospital.

“It was very odd back then, way more odd than today,” David said.

“I can remember the doctors finding it strange that I was a man and a nurse. They didn’t know what to make of it.

“But the patients mainly didn’t care, they appreciated everything I tried to do for them.”

David spent the majority of his career at the Northern General Hospital on the same spinal unit ward.

He said: “The one thing with spinal injuries is that you often get patients who I have known from being a boy right through to adulthood.

“At times it was a hard job, a demanding job in many ways the emotions and stresses of operating in such an organisation like the NHS were trying.

“But the patients for me is why I got up in the morning.

“I can’t think of many other jobs with the same satisfaction and feel-good emotion you get.”

David also thanked his many colleagues saying he was ‘part of the team.’

“I’ve not done this on my own, I’ve worked with some absolutely fantastic members of staff, it’s always a team effort everyday.”

David said he was ready for retirement and plans to spend more time on his bike.