Street art marks the spot where Tour swept into Sheffield

Cyclists who take on the Tour de France King of Mountains climbs can see the street art which has been painted on to replicate phrases members of the public painted on the roads. Picture: Andrew Roe

Cyclists who take on the Tour de France King of Mountains climbs can see the street art which has been painted on to replicate phrases members of the public painted on the roads. Picture: Andrew Roe

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It was the spot where elite riders sped into Sheffield for the historic Tour de France before racing for miles past cheering crowds of jubilant spectators.

Now ‘Welcome to Sheffield’ will be permanently displayed on Mortimer Road, Midhopestones, where the peloton entered the city in July 2014.

Cyclists who take on the Tour de France King of Mountains climbs can see the street art which has been painted on to replicate phrases members of the public painted on the roads. Picture: Andrew Roe

Cyclists who take on the Tour de France King of Mountains climbs can see the street art which has been painted on to replicate phrases members of the public painted on the roads. Picture: Andrew Roe

The art work is part of a scheme to create a tourist attraction and celebrate the legacy of the Grand Depart in Sheffield.

Stone markers have been installed at the start and finish lines, in Attercliffe and Midhopestones.

And some of the more memorable street art sprayed on to the roads by residents is to be painted back on at each of the four King of the Mountain climbs at Midhopestones, Bradfield, Oughtibridge and the notoriously steep Jenkin Hill in Wincobank.

The phrases include ‘it’s only pain’ and ‘Ey up TdF’ as well as ‘By ‘eck lad, it’s steep’ and ‘Get them knees up.’

A stone marker as been placed at the start Midhopestones Tour de France King of Mountains climb. Picture: Andrew Roe

A stone marker as been placed at the start Midhopestones Tour de France King of Mountains climb. Picture: Andrew Roe

Coun Leigh Bramall, council cabinet member for business, skills and development, said the project tied in with the aim of branding Sheffield as the ‘outdoor city’.

He added: “At the same time, I think it is absolutely crucial the excitement and inspiration generated by the Tour in Sheffield last year is preserved for future generations.

“More than 380,000 people lined the streets of Sheffield to watch the race, and our city was showcased on television to more than 18.6 million people worldwide.

“A post-event survey showed that three quarters of spectators would recommend Sheffield as a tourist destination to family and friends. This sort of enthusiasm is exactly what we need to capture and remember.

“We hope that this street art, together with the stone celebration markers, will cement a long-term legacy of increased cycling participation, attract cyclists and visitors to the city, and remind those who see them of the glorious Grand Depart.”

A guide for residents and visitors to use will accompany the street art and encourage people to travel all or part of the route.

The £15,000 project is being sponsored by council contractor Amey, which resurfaced roads on the route and cleaned up after the race, as well as Eleven Design.

Glenn Thornley, from Eleven Design, said: “Having the Tour De France come to your home town is a little bit like finding out that the World Cup final will be played in your local park.

“Being able to ride on the same roads as your cycling heroes is like being let loose for a kick-a-bout on Wembley’s hallowed turf.

“Eleven Design are proud to be involved in a project that celebrates a very special day in our city’s sporting history and paves the way for future generations of cyclists to explore our city, find these iconic routes and test themselves on our lung-bursting climbs.”