Telegraph View: New route ahead for festival

Ellen Beardmore
Ellen Beardmore

Who can believe that Tramlines has been going for a whole decade?

The ninth music festival was held last weekend. Once again, thousands of people from across the region attended to sing, dance and make merry to their favourite acts.

Attracting headline names and celebrating a city’s spirit is a difficult balancing act for any organiser

As ever, the stages, pubs and streets were packed. The Everly Pregnant Brothers climbed on a roof. And the weather didn’t matter a jot.

But Tramlines has changed a lot since 2009.

And there are big plans in place for its future, with the aim of protecting the free fringe element which is the real heart of the festival - and is so beneficial to Sheffield’s economy - as well as keeping the local flavour which some believe has ebbed away over the years as more of the festival became ticketed.

Attracting headline names and celebrating a city’s spirit is a difficult balancing act for any organiser.

The Sheffield-based Music City Foundation had its £1.2 million bid to take over Tramlines accepted in principle, and now plans to offer shares in the event to traders and the public.

How novel to own a slice of a music festival!

It also seems necessary, with similar festivals across the country bowing out recently and increased competition. Tramlines has become a major part of Sheffield’s social calendar. If we want to keep it, then it must be supported.

The summer holidays are officially here. One study suggests parents can spend over £2,000 keeping their kids entertained during the break - which seems unbelievable until you factor in the cost of a break abroad at peak season.

There are plenty of activities in Sheffield which won’t break the bank, however.

See our guide to completely free activities available - from learning how to play tennis to touring petting farms - on page 43.