VIDEO: Incredible Sheffield great-grandmother with TWO birthdays a year turns 106

You would think being 106-years-old is unique enough - but not for Sheffield woman May Lashmar.

For the great-grandmother shares something very special with The Queen - as she has TWO birthdays a year.

John and May Lashmar with the birthday cake.

John and May Lashmar with the birthday cake.

May celebrated her 106th birthday today having been born on May 11 1911.

But when her dad was given the money to register her birth in Walthamstow, North London, he stopped off at the pub to celebrate - and didn’t get around to doing the job until August 1.

So while May and her family celebrated the anniversary of her actual date of birth today, she will not receive a card from The Queen until her 'officially registered' birthday on August 1.

Her Majesty also enjoys an actual birthday and an official one - a royal tradition dating back generations.

May Lashmar with her cake.

May Lashmar with her cake.

May's son John, aged 71, said: "The story has been passed down through the generations and always gives us a laugh.

"Her dad went to the pub apparently to celebrate her birth. Then months later they realised that if you did not register a birth in time then you got a fine, so they registered the birth date to the nearest day possible which was August 1.

"It is an amazing achievement to reach this age.

"She already has two cards from The Queen for turning 100, and then 105. So she will get a third one in August for turning 106."

She has always said that an active lifestyle is the key to a good life.

She celebrated with a birthday cake while family and staff at Grange Crescent Care Home in Sharrow sang happy birthday to her.

May - who was one of ten children - grew up in Walthamstow and later became an office worker.

She lived on the Isle of White for more than 60 years and married husband Jack, a wood cutting machinist and lifeboat builder until his death in 1970. She has two sons, four grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

A keen bowler and golfer until she was well into her 90s, she coached county bowls on the Isle of Wight.

She also helped set up the National Playing Fields Association on the island, a trust that helps protect sports pitches and children’s playgrounds.

She moved to be Sheffield in 2012 to live with her son John and his family but is now happily settled into her care home.