Sheffield Wednesday: Carlos Carvalhal tells English coaches to grab experience abroad

Owls head coach Carlos Carvalhal says Breitish coaches need to broaden their horizons....Pic Steve Ellis

Owls head coach Carlos Carvalhal says Breitish coaches need to broaden their horizons....Pic Steve Ellis

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Sheffield Wednesday boss Carlos Carvalhal has told English football coaches that they would better themselves by spending time working outside of the UK.

The issue of foreign coaches in the British game, and the allegations from some quarters that home-grown potential managers aren’t getting enough opportunities, reared its head again recently when Ryan Giggs was overlooked for the Swansea job, eventually given to American, Bob Bradley.

Happy pair Carlos Carvalhal and coach Lee Bullen...Pic Steve Ellis

Happy pair Carlos Carvalhal and coach Lee Bullen...Pic Steve Ellis

Carvalhal, like Bradley, spent many years working in different countries, a factor which he says has improved his coaching immeasurably.

The new Swans boss began in his home country then had spells in Egypt, Norway and France.

Carvalhal’s experience is truly global, with the Portuguese having worked at home as well as Greece, Turkey, the Middle East and now the UK.

The 50 year old was Sheffield Wednesday’s first coach from outside the British Isles and it is a route taken early by top flight teams and filtered down to the divisions beneath.

Carlos Carvalhal and Huddersfield Town's David Wagner are so far two of the more successful foreign coaches

Carlos Carvalhal and Huddersfield Town's David Wagner are so far two of the more successful foreign coaches

From an Owls point of view it has been a successful decision so far, just like that of David Wagner at Huddersfield Town, with the two going head-to-head at the John Smith’s Stadium on Sunday.

Carvalhal believes rather than complaining about foreign coaches taking jobs in Britain, coaches should broaden their own horizons.

“Coaches here must go outside because if they go outside they will teach another player, they will teach in another environment but they will learn also,” he says.

“They will be better coaches, because when we go outside to another country, of course we go there to teach but we are learning with a lot of competition and learning all the time.

“When we finish the work we are better coaches. It is a different mentality, you open more horizons, we look to different things. I think this is very positive.”

He added: “It is not a question of money, it is a question of exploration and being better. If we compare our ideas with another and put our ideas against another, we are learning all the time the way we must act.”

READ MORE: Chris Holt’s Owls Column - Foreign coaches are here to stay... just get used to it

Carvalhal feels the time when come when more coaches from these shores take the risks and move to develop their experience.

“When we understand and open the mind when we are back to our countries we are better coaches absolutely sure,” he said. “We are more ready, more understanding, probably will be on the team with the players of the nationality where we worked, so we understand them better.

“This will happen naturally in the future here because the quality of the English coaches are very good.”

His arrival in Sheffield last June signalled the dawn of a new era, but Carvalhal was keen to ensure there was a British identity in the backroom staff, with Andy Rhodes and Lee Bullen among the staff.

And he feels he learns just as much from them as he passes on.

“I have English coaches working with me and I am sure we are learning with them and they are learning with us,” added the Portuguese. “One time when we leave the club I think they will be better coaches, like we are better coaches because we are learning with them also.

“If the people are clever and learn all the time and keep information and compare with the way they saw the game with different mentalities they can improve.”