Shelley’s gold standard

Shelly Rudman of Great Britain speeds down the track on her way to win the women's skeleton World Cup in Koenigssee, southern Germany, on Friday, Jan. 13, 2012. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)
Shelly Rudman of Great Britain speeds down the track on her way to win the women's skeleton World Cup in Koenigssee, southern Germany, on Friday, Jan. 13, 2012. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Golden girl Shelley Rudman is on a fast track for more glory.

The Sheffield-based Skeleton star claimed her first World Cup series gold medal in Germany and bids for a repeat on her favourite track in St Moritz, tomorrow.

Shelly Rudman of Great Britain reacts after winning the women's skeleton World Cup in Koenigssee, southern Germany, on Friday, Jan. 13, 2012. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Shelly Rudman of Great Britain reacts after winning the women's skeleton World Cup in Koenigssee, southern Germany, on Friday, Jan. 13, 2012. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Shelley was fastest on both runs at Konigssee and blew the opposition away to win by half a second, which in Skeleton terms is a huge margin, considering that victory can usually be decided by hundreths of a second.

“I’m so happy to have won my first World Cup race,” said Shelley. “Everything seems to be coming together on the track and hopefully that will lead to more success.”

The 30-year-old, who won Olympic silver in 2006, bagged bronze in the previous race in Altenberg, Germany, which doubled up as the European Championships. Home track racers took gold and silver while Shelley, the defending European champion, finished just 0.12 seconds behind the winner.

She now stands third in the overall standings after round five of the eight race series, 41 points behind Germany’s Marion Thees and 32 adrift of Canada’s Mellisa Hollingsworth.

Shelley, who has finished as the overall World Cup runner-up for the last three years, now goes for more glory in a freezing St Moritz - temperatures have hit -18 degrees centigrade in the Swiss resort - where she aims for her fourth successive gold medal.

The final two legs take place in Whistler and Calgary in Canada next month and the season then reaches an end with the World Championships at Lake Placid, from February 13-26.

Her ‘other half’ Kristen Bromley, of Sheffield-based Bronmley Technologies, is also competing in the men’s event where he has so far gained two top six and two top 10 placings.

lSkeleton is a fast winter sliding sport in which an individual person rides a small sled down a frozen track while lying face down, during which they can reach speeds of around 90mph and experience forces up to 5g.

It originated in St. Moritz, Switzerland as a spin-off from the popular British sport of Cresta sledding.

l Bromley Technologies Ltd is arguably the world’s best commercial manufacturer of equipment for winter Olympic sliding sports.

Their equipment has secured over 40 world class medals in bobsleigh and skeleton bob competitions, including two Olympic skeleton medals, two World Championships and numerous World Cup wins.

The company currently sells its equipment to athletes from over 20 countries.