Food: Master caterer can wow on grand scale

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There are no secrets when it comes to successful catering on a large scale,” according to Seymour Millington, whose career story features in the Sheffield Cookbook: Second Helpings. 
He added: “It all comes down to one thing - just cook.”

Seymour’s impressive career in food involved working at some of the country’s finest establishments before he moved into event catering at some of the country’s biggest sports stadiums.

A Master Chef of Great Britain, local lad Seymour was trained by Mick Burke, formerly of Sheffield College.

Having progressed to work at such places as Park Lane Hotel in London, Riverside House Hotel at Ashford-in-the-Water, and Rhodes& Co and Radisson Blu Edwardian in Manchester, the transition to stadium event catering was a change of direction for Seymour.

Whether it’s a huge award ceremony, a corporate event or a political party conference, Seymour Millington has built a reputation for managing events with precision and perfection.

He aims to spread the message that there is so much more to stadium catering than a pie before a match or a cup of Bovril.

Sheffield City College,Dept of Hospitality,Catering.Bakery,and Aviation...BUDGET XMAS LUNCH FEATURE...Mick Burke,Senior Chef Lecturer,carving Turkey

Sheffield City College,Dept of Hospitality,Catering.Bakery,and Aviation...BUDGET XMAS LUNCH FEATURE...Mick Burke,Senior Chef Lecturer,carving Turkey

“Expectations are immensely high when it comes to catering today and there is nowhere to hide when you are cooking anymore”, he said.

So is there really no secret to getting beautiful dishes out to hundreds of people?

Seymour insists it is about focusing on the food, simply cooking properly and planning well.

It’s all about using good ingredients and preparing them well:

“The benefit you have when catering for a set number of people is there are no surprises.

You know exactly how many people you have to cook for and the schedule for the event in advance.

“This means with attention to detail and a focus on getting the best from your ingredients, you can create dishes that will wow the guests.”

Seymour is an ardent supporter of Skills for Chefs and he works with Mick Burke, his former tutor, to inspire aspiring young chefs.

A passionate ambassador for event catering, Seymour also aims to continue leading the way in dishing up delicious dishes at stadiums across the country and promoting the high standards of culinary excellence that are going on behind the scenes.

He is one of the chefs lined up to star in this month’s Sheffield Food Festival and will be in the Theatre Kitchen marquee on Saturday May 27, from 12.45pm.

He will be making barbecue spiced belly with apple textures: barbecued spiced belly of pork with compressed apple, burnt apple puree and an apple and honey gel and salmon cured in True North Sheffield dry gin with watermelon, cucumber ketchup and pickles.

Here he has shared another recipe for chocolate and peanut butter fudge with Telegraph readers ahead of the festival.

This year the festival will include an ‘Eats, Beats and Treats’ night market on Fargate for the first time, as well as dozens of stalls, a pop up farmyard and a packed weekend of demonstrations.

The Sheffield Cookbook: Second Helpings is available from Amazon, Waterstone’s and at the venues featured in it.

RECIPE

Chocolate and peanut fudge

This recipe makes 25 pieces

Ingredients

300g caster sugar

255ml double cream

65g glucose liquid or powdered

50g dark chocolate

100g crunchy peanut butter

METHOD

Firstly weigh out all ingredients, if using liquid glucose, dip a spoon in warm water then in to

the glucose to prevent it from sticking then put it directly onto the sugaR.

Put the cream, sugar and glucose in a thick bottomED pan.

On a medium heat, warm the mixture until it reaches 118 degrees .

Carefully pour the mixture into a food processor and beat on speed one with the paddle

attachment until you are able to touch the bottom of the bowl with your hand and still feelwarmth but not hot heat

This will help give a smooth soft finish

Then add the chocolate, once melted with the residual heat, add the peanut butter as well.

Once cool, and firm enough to spread, spread evenly on a baking tray between sheets of greaseproof

paper.

Set aside till full cooled

Portion into desired shape, roll the shapes in caster sugar and then serve .