Music In The Gardens: No rain at Sheffield concert is music to our ears

Special: Big Band sound at Botanical Gardens.
Special: Big Band sound at Botanical Gardens.

A GLIMPSE of sunshine after days of grey clouds helped ensure Sheffield’s Music in the Gardens got off to a swinging start.

Organisers’ prayers were answered when the relentless rainfall held off for the opening night of the annual event in the city’s Botanical Gardens.

Damp ground did not deter around 1,200 music fans from perching on picnic spots to get a good view of the Big Band concert.

Humid temperatures and the balmy scent of summer permeated through the picturesque gardens as generations young and old gathered near to the pavilion for opening act the University of Sheffield Big Band.

Talented students entertained the crowds with renditions of well-known classics such as Glenn Miller’s In the Mood and The Stripper – which featured in Sheffield-set film The Full Monty.

Proving he is the king of the swingers once again, Keith Peters took to the stage with his band to perform a catalogue of hits.

Local legend Keith has opened the event for the past five years.

Julie Rhoades, 48, of Nether Edge, Sheffield, said: “I’ve been before and it’s always very good.”

The annual extravaganza, now in its sixth year, is organised by the Rotary Clubs of Sheffield and young Rotaracts.

Tonight will see the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain performing in the unique fashion which has given them a cult following across the UK, with rockers 10cc headlining on Friday and a classical concert finale on Saturday.

Geoff Marston, Music in the Gardens committee chairman, said: “I’m really pleased with tonight’s turnout. If we hadn’t have had rain around 4pm I am sure there would be even more people here.”

The forecast of more rain has put a grey cloud over the heads of organisers, but they are keen for people to show some traditional British spirit and brave the elements.

Tickets for each concert are available at the gate, but Friday is almost sold out.