Sheffield artist Pete McKee hits out at his charity posters being sold on eBay

Artist Pete McKee in his studio.

Artist Pete McKee in his studio.

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Famous Sheffield artist Pete McKee has hit out at people selling his limited edition charity posters online.

Pete has been creating his distinctive style posters for various charity events over the last few years, raising cash for good causes.

However, the 49-year-old has seen an increasing number of them then being put up for sale on eBay – and has now decided to take action against the sellers.

Pete has vowed to ban anyone found selling the limited edition charity posters from buying any future limited edition prints.

A poster featuring veteran rock band The Who was put up for sale at £750, while a signed piece of Welsh band Stereophonics sold for £560. Both had been created for the Teenage Cancer Trust.

He said: “Over the last few years, I have had the pleasure of creating some limited edition charity posters for various events.

“All the prints have been well received and always sold out, raising a huge amount for these charities. But recently I have noticed quite a few of these prints for sale on eBay, blatantly being sold at a high price to make money for the individual.

“Unfortunately, these kind of actions are damaging to my artwork and the charities involved, as money was intended to be raised for them.

“Because of this, it could stop us from doing these kind of projects in the future.

“I have decided to take action and those found selling prints like this online will now be banned from buying any future limited edition prints, either through me or the galleries I work with.

“I didn’t want to have to do this, but making money out of a charity is not what I want to happen.

“I know these people are a tiny minority so to everyone else, thank you for your continued love and support over the last 10 years.”

Pete regularly designs Christmas cards for Artfelt, the Sheffield Children’s Hospital Charity’s arts programme. This year, the sales raised £13,000.