Items from historic ‘haunted’ Sheffield pub advertised for sale

Carbrook Hall in Attercliffe
Carbrook Hall in Attercliffe

Items from a historic Sheffield pub have been advertised for sale on Facebook, prompting concerns from the building’s owner and heritage campaigners.

Carbrook Hall is a Grade II*-listed building dating back to 1176, which has links to the Civil War and the siege of Sheffield Castle, and is reputedly haunted.

The bottle, said to be from Carbrook Hall, was advertised for sale by a Jamie Smith on the Sheffield History Facebook page

The bottle, said to be from Carbrook Hall, was advertised for sale by a Jamie Smith on the Sheffield History Facebook page

The premises were sold last year and there were five break-ins before a arsonists started a blaze which damaged part of the interior in April.

READ MORE: South Yorkshire gang armed with machete and a knife drag terrified women from car

A Jamie Smith this week posted a photo of a ceramic bottle on the Sheffield History Facebook group, along with the message ‘From Carbrook Hall PM me offers’.

The bottle says ‘Samuel Hilton Carbook Sheffield’ on the front and a message on the neck, dated 1914, reads ‘anyone detaining this bottle is liable to be prosecuted’.

After the message was posted some people questioned how he had got hold of an item from the historic building.

READ MORE: Meet the Sheffield blacksmiths helping to keep our roads safe

He responded, saying: “What's on here was destined for the skip so I saved it.”

When someone asked about the price, he wrote: “Best offer so far is £25 but got someone interested in buying everything I've got from Carbrook Hall as a job lot.”

The pub's owner Sean Fogg, of West Street Leisure, initially insisted he had not given anyone permission to take anything from the pub.

READ MORE: 10 of Yorkshire’s ‘most haunted’ buildings

He said: “The only things which went in the skip were parts which had been badly burned and were ripped out to make the building safe.”

Mr Smith and Mr Fogg have since said there was a ‘misunderstanding’ between the pair and that the items have been returned to the pub.

The pub is one of Sheffield's oldest buildings and the wood panelling inside is particularly prized, but none of the items from within – including a replica coat of armour and various prints connected with the Civil War – are believed to be historically significant.

Mr Fogg has said he is in talks with a multi-national company about leasing the building so it can be restored and opened up to the public again.

Sheffield historian Ron Clayton said he was concerned that items from the pub were being advertised for sale.

“Worries among the heritage community can only be heightened by the fact the pub is losing some of the items which – while they may not be of any great historical importance – contributed to the pub's atmosphere,” he said.