This is how the porn age verification will actually work - according to the software developers

Thursday, 9th May 2019, 4:13 pm
Updated Thursday, 9th May 2019, 4:15 pm
X-rated websites will be blocked on 15 July this year by all internet providers (Photo: Shutterstock)

X-rated websites will be blocked on 15 July this year by all internet providers, and users required to verify their age before being allowed to view adult content.

People will be automatically blocked from using free sites like PornHub and YouPorn, unless they can prove they are old enough to do so.

But how will the porn age verification actually work? This is everything you need to know, according to the makers of the AgeID software.

Why do I have to prove my age to watch porn?

This automatic block, introduced under the Digital Economy Act 2017, is being put in place in an attempt to prevent children from seeing inappropriate content.

The Act states that commercial providers of pornographic content should have age verification checks on their websites, in order to prevent children from viewing explicit images and videos.

The terms of the Digital Economy Act 2017 state that online commercial pornography services which can be accessed from the UK must use an age verification system.

Mindgeek, the company that owns Pornhub and YouPorn, has developed a system called AgeID.

What is AgeID and how will it work?

James Clark, Director of Communications at AgeID, said, “First, a user can register an AgeID account using an email address and password.

“The user verifies their email address and then chooses an age verification option from our list of third party providers, using options such as Mobile SMS, Credit Card, Passport, or Driving Licence.

“The second option is to purchase a PortesCard or voucher from a retail outlet. Using this method, a customer does not need to register an email address, and can simply access the site using the Portes app.”

Serge Acker, the CEO of OCL, creator of Portes, said, “The new age verification laws are a positive step in the right direction.

“The implementation comes with a view to prevent young and vulnerable people from stumbling across sensitive content with ease.”

One of the ways of verifying age will require users to show their driver’s license, passport or credit card (Photo: Shutterstock)

What is Portes and how does it verify age?

Mr Acker explains how age verification technology, and the Digital Economy Act, has been met with criticism, with some “opposed to their internet use being restricted”, with others having “concerns with how their data will be stored by age verification companies.”

However, he adds that “Portes is built on total privacy.”

How do I use Portes?

Users can purchase a Portes Protection pass at their local shop, where they will need to prove their age.

This voucher contains a 16 digit alpha-numerical code, which users will then need to input into the Portes app to confirm their age-related status.

“This allows users to access age-restricted content without handing over any ID oraccompanying personal information”, as “ no personal information is ever kept on our servers,” explains Mr Acker.

Further to this, to prevent under-18s from simply obtaining a code from someone older, parents can download the app for free, and install it on their children’s devices and then activate a ‘lock’.

This then means that:

· The app is password protected, so that parents can be sure their children can’t accessage-restricted content· The app cannot be removed by the child· Any code activated on that device can be immediately burned, thus made unusable

What happens to my data?

Portes is unique in that it doesn’t require or store information to prove any status.

All that is required is the user proving his or her age at the moment of purchase at the point of sale.

“It’s effectively emphasising ‘what’ you are, without disclosing ‘who’ you are,” says Mr Acker.

“By virtue of not requiring any further ID or information, this means no data on the user is stored, other than that they are verified as being old enough to access the content they are trying to access.”

This article originally appeared on our sister site, The Scotsman