Shocking footage shows disabled Sheffield woman struggling to get past car on pavement

Shocking footage of a disabled Sheffield woman struggling to manoeuvre past a car parked on a pavement has sparked outrage on Twitter. 

The footage, uploaded by Twitter user Julie T, shows a woman using a motorised wheelchair down a narrow pavement. 

The footage has caused outrage on Twitter - Credit: @xjuewx

The footage has caused outrage on Twitter - Credit: @xjuewx

She is then filmed trying to turn left into a tight entrance but is being blocked from turning fully by a car parked on the pavement. 

The woman then reverses out of the gap, narrowly missing hitting the parked car, to straighten up the wheelchair. 

She then narrowly manages to squeeze through the entrance before the camera pans back to two women sitting in the car. 

The footage has been viewed thousands of times on Twitter, prompting outrage from users. 

Cliff Matthews tweeted: “How did that person manage that without scratching the car. I'm sure I would have ended up scratching the car.”

Simon Hewitt tweeted: “The owner of that car should be thankful she didn't scratch it! Pavements are not for parking. If you can't park without blocking the road then find somewhere else to park and have some consideration.”

John Dunne tweeted: “I thought it had been left there. The fact it was occupied makes it infinitely worse.”

Peter Brown tweeted: “This is the kind of vehicular entitlement we need to prevent by outlawing all pavement parking.”

Drivers in London can be fined for parking their cars on the pavement and Department for Transport officials are hoping to expand it across the country.

The proposal has been suggested by DfT previously with drivers potentially hit with £70 fines for mounting the kerb but were never introduced.

However, it was reported back in April that the government is now once again looking at the issue as part of a wider overhaul of traffic regulations.

Transport minister Jesse Norman said: “The Department for Transport has been considering the scope for improving the traffic regulation order process.

“However, the department is now undertaking a broader piece of work to gather evidence on the issue of pavement parking. We expect to be able to draw conclusions later this year.

"We expect to be able to draw conclusions later this year."

A Sheffield council spokesperson said: "Highway authorities already have some powers to prohibit parking on pavements, and we would be interested in any proposals that would help to address these further, especially if they allow greater flexibility and discretion to be applied by civil enforcement officers while ensuring a consistent approach to motorists."

A bill allowing councils to ban pavement parking over wide areas was debated in parliament in 2015 but it was withdrawn without being approved.