Walking on the Edge

Howden edge
Howden edge

 This is a long walk onto exposed moorland on Howden Edge. From Langsett the route follows farm tracks across access land before climbing up by Near Cat Clough onto Howden Edge.

The route then climbs to the trig point at Outer Edge with views across the dark peak area to Win and Loose Hills.

The return route is along the pack horse route, Cut Gate, before cutting off to the ruins at North America, and then back by the side of the reservoir.

Much of this route is on access land which is used for grouse shooting.

The land owner can close the area for short periods.

This is usually in the shooting and nesting seasons.

There may also be restrictions on taking dogs onto grouse moor access land.

More information is available on the Natural England Website. In the 1870’s, R.H.Rimington-Wilson, of Broomhead Hall, re-introduced the mountain hare to the area.

1. Take the path at the opposite corner of the car park to the Barn.

Follow the path down the hill and then along by the reservoir all the way up to the top end of the reservoir.

Langsett Reservoir was constructed between 1889 and 1905 when a temporary village of corrugated iron huts was built near Langsett village to house construction workers.  It is now managed by Yorkshire Water. It is around a mile long, with an area of 51 hectares and a depth of 29 m. It supplies water to Sheffield and Barnsley.

2. At the junction with the track down to the bridge, turn right and go up as far as the concrete slab (20 m). Turn left across the grass.

3. Take the right hand bridge and go up the path through the trees.

4. At the old barn turn right and go along the farm track to the junction.

Go through the gate then take the left fork and follow the path round between the walls.

5. After ~300 m, turn right, through the gate and up the straight wide track between the stone walls.

6. Continue, passing through two gates, until this track drops out onto another farm track.

Turn left The A616, Woodhead Pass and the Dog and Partridge Public House can both be clearly seen away to your right.

7. Follow this track for 1.4 miles (2.3 km) until it reaches a low farm building in a walled enclosure.

Go left and pass below the enclosure.

8. After 50 m, take the quad track left down the hill.

As you crest the ridge you will be able to see the bridge over the stream over to the right.

Follow the track down to the bridge.

9. Cross the bridge.

The path goes straight up the hill, through the heather, subsequently passing a series of grouse butts.  Continue up the hill until you reach the top, with a view across to Rocking Stones.

10. At the marker post, turn left, and follow the path up to the trig point at Outer Edge (541 m). You will pass two boundary stones, both marked, ‘B’ and a series of marker posts.

You may wish to take a diversion out to the edge.  There are views across the Dark Peak to Win Hill, Loose Hill and Kinder Scout.

11. From the trig point continue along the path in the direction of Margery Hill. As the path starts to rise it meets the pack horse route, Cut Gate.

12. Turn left and follow Cut Gate down. After 1.3 miles (2.1 km) take the right turn at the footpath sign.

Follow the path across the moor to the ruins of North America Farm.  Turn right and follow the forestry track across the bridge over the stream and through the metal gate.

The lane leading to North America Farm was used by tanks practising for the 1944 Normandy landings during the Second World War.  It was strengthened by using rubble from houses bombarded during the Sheffield blitz. The ruined farm was used for target practice by tanks based near Upper Midhope.

You can see the indentations caused by shells on the remaining stones. The name ‘North America’ probably came from the practice of calling outlying farms after far-off parts of the world – the good land was so far form the parent farm it might as well be at the other side of the world!

13. Take the path by the side of the reservoir. Follow a path through the woods, keeping near the reservoir.

As the path comes level with the dam take the path across to the woods and exit through the gap by the junction of the road with the lane.

14. Turn left and follow the road back across the dam wall. Take the path back by the spillway and return to the car park.

Langsett Barn is owned by Yorkshire Water. It is used as a Peak Park Ranger centre and is also available for community hire.  It is of timber frame construction, with a stone dated 1621 on the gable end.  However, some details, such as the narrow church style windows give the impression of a much earlier medieval building like a tithe barn.

It was one of several barns in the locality used for storing various arable crops and hay used for winter stock feed. The big double doors would have allowed fully loaded horse-drawn carts to enter and unload.

The name ‘Langsett’ first appears in a charter of 1252 which tells of an agreement, whereby Walter de Houdham granted his whole manor at Langside to Elias de Midhope.

This walk was written and produced by Stocksbridge Walkers Are Welcome for more interesting walks please visit http://www.stocksbridge-walkers.org.uk

Living streets project: If you come across a footpath sign that is in poor condition or not easy to read can you make a note of its location and send this to info@stocksbridge.org. It may be possible to replace the sign through a project called Living Streets.

The route then climbs to the trig point at Outer Edge with views across the dark peak area to Win and Loose Hills.

The return route is along the pack horse route, Cut Gate, before cutting off to the ruins at North America, and then back by the side of the reservoir.

Much of this route is on access land which is used for grouse shooting.

The land owner can close the area for short periods.

This is usually in the shooting and nesting seasons.

There may also be restrictions on taking dogs onto grouse moor access land.

More information is available on the Natural England Website. In the 1870’s, R.H.Rimington-Wilson, of Broomhead Hall, re-introduced the mountain hare to the area.

1. Take the path at the opposite corner of the car park to the Barn.

Follow the path down the hill and then along by the reservoir all the way up to the top end of the reservoir.

Langsett Reservoir was constructed between 1889 and 1905 when a temporary village of corrugated iron huts was built near Langsett village to house construction workers.  It is now managed by Yorkshire Water. It is around a mile long, with an area of 51 hectares and a depth of 29 m. It supplies water to Sheffield and Barnsley.

2. At the junction with the track down to the bridge, turn right and go up as far as the concrete slab (20 m). Turn left across the grass.

3. Take the right hand bridge and go up the path through the trees.

4. At the old barn turn right and go along the farm track to the junction.

Go through the gate then take the left fork and follow the path round between the walls.

5. After ~300 m, turn right, through the gate and up the straight wide track between the stone walls.

6. Continue, passing through two gates, until this track drops out onto another farm track.

Turn left The A616, Woodhead Pass and the Dog and Partridge Public House can both be clearly seen away to your right.

7. Follow this track for 1.4 miles (2.3 km) until it reaches a low farm building in a walled enclosure.

Go left and pass below the enclosure.

8. After 50 m, take the quad track left down the hill.

As you crest the ridge you will be able to see the bridge over the stream over to the right.

Follow the track down to the bridge.

9. Cross the bridge.

The path goes straight up the hill, through the heather, subsequently passing a series of grouse butts.  Continue up the hill until you reach the top, with a view across to Rocking Stones.

10. At the marker post, turn left, and follow the path up to the trig point at Outer Edge (541 m). You will pass two boundary stones, both marked, ‘B’ and a series of marker posts.

You may wish to take a diversion out to the edge.  There are views across the Dark Peak to Win Hill, Loose Hill and Kinder Scout.

11. From the trig point continue along the path in the direction of Margery Hill. As the path starts to rise it meets the pack horse route, Cut Gate.

12. Turn left and follow Cut Gate down. After 1.3 miles (2.1 km) take the right turn at the footpath sign.

Follow the path across the moor to the ruins of North America Farm.  Turn right and follow the forestry track across the bridge over the stream and through the metal gate.

The lane leading to North America Farm was used by tanks practising for the 1944 Normandy landings during the Second World War.  It was strengthened by using rubble from houses bombarded during the Sheffield blitz. The ruined farm was used for target practice by tanks based near Upper Midhope.

You can see the indentations caused by shells on the remaining stones. The name ‘North America’ probably came from the practice of calling outlying farms after far-off parts of the world – the good land was so far form the parent farm it might as well be at the other side of the world!

13. Take the path by the side of the reservoir. Follow a path through the woods, keeping near the reservoir.

As the path comes level with the dam take the path across to the woods and exit through the gap by the junction of the road with the lane.

14. Turn left and follow the road back across the dam wall. Take the path back by the spillway and return to the car park.

Langsett Barn is owned by Yorkshire Water. It is used as a Peak Park Ranger centre and is also available for community hire.  It is of timber frame construction, with a stone dated 1621 on the gable end.  However, some details, such as the narrow church style windows give the impression of a much earlier medieval building like a tithe barn.

It was one of several barns in the locality used for storing various arable crops and hay used for winter stock feed. The big double doors would have allowed fully loaded horse-drawn carts to enter and unload.

The name ‘Langsett’ first appears in a charter of 1252 which tells of an agreement, whereby Walter de Houdham granted his whole manor at Langside to Elias de Midhope.

This walk was written and produced by Stocksbridge Walkers Are Welcome for more interesting walks please visit http://www.stocksbridge-walkers.org.uk

Living streets project: If you come across a footpath sign that is in poor condition or not easy to read can you make a note of its location and send this to info@stocksbridge.org. It may be possible to replace the sign through a project called Living Streets.

Howden Edge from Langsett

• Length 11.0 miles

• Grade – This is a demanding walk with long sections on exposed high level moorland. It is a walk for experienced and well equipped walkers. We would not advise attempting the moorland part of this walk in snowy conditions (8 => 12)

• Start - Langsett Barn Car Park (free parking). If it is full use the lay-by 200 m up the hill

• Grid Reference - SE 210 004 • Map - OL1 Dark Peak

• Public transport – National Express route 350 (Liverpool to Cambridge) stops at the Wagon and Horses Inn, Langsett.

• Refreshments - The Waggon and Horses Inn, Bankview Café, Langsett

• Public Toilets – Langsett Barn