In Focus: Family moments captured in all their mundanity and joy

Heart warming  mum and pup image by John Scholey
Heart warming mum and pup image by John Scholey

We are into the final week of our family theme before we move to a new topic.

I have had some great entries again but there is still time to enter, even if you have already sent in an image we would love to see them.

Another one of John Scholey's images showing family life

Another one of John Scholey's images showing family life

John Scholey is a regular now on our page but his image of a seal with her pup is so adorable. It’s all in the eyes you see. If you want to draw out the emotion in an image, focus on the eyes of the subject and we are instantly drawn in.

Gareth Morgan, another regular, has sent in a natural image of a couple sat on a bench with their pets, I was amused that the little dog was barely noticable as it stands underneath his ‘big brother’.

The family of coloured huts is another take on our theme and was taken by another regular of ours, John Beadman.

You can always get inspired by a theme by typing into an image search or Instagram, there are a few on Google images using props that are quite unusual. the web is full of great ideas just waiting to be improved on. so get creative, even if you don’t have a fancy camera your mobile phone can take some amazing shots.

A couple with their two family pets by  Gareth Morgan

A couple with their two family pets by Gareth Morgan

Composition is everything in portraits by Simon Grason

I’ve been flicking through this month’s competition entries this morning and I have to say I’m very impressed with the quality so far.

There’s lots of lovely, vibrant images and I can see that people have been putting a lot of thought into the composition, this theme is obviously one that people are very passionate about.

The theme of ‘family’ brings us nicely onto the topic of portrait photography so this week I’d like to give you some tips on shooting portraits.

John Beadman's unusual take on the theme with a family of huts

John Beadman's unusual take on the theme with a family of huts

First of all, composition is everything.

Don’t be afraid to go in tight and really fill the frame with your subject, don’t worry about chopping off the top of the head when you’re concentrating on the facial features. Next, think about light.

How does your subject look? Do they have shadows under their eyes?

Are they squinting into the sunlight?

Is one side of their face bright and the other side is in shadow?

You can easily balance the light with a burst of flash or by simply using a cheap handheld reflector.

Finally, relax. Spend some time with your subject and take a lot of pictures, don’t expect the first few images to be great, once your subject starts to relax then the truly great shots will start to appear.