Showroom Cinema: A tumultuous love story

editorial image

As September slowly saunters towards us and we prepare for the days to shorten and the sun to cool, the cinema calendar is starting to heat right up. BlacKkKlansman and The Children Act opened last weekend to critical acclaim; this week we continue with some festival favourites and award winners, and dive into a scintillating new season of ‘Stage on Screen’ events from National Theatre Live.

Pawel Pawlikowski’s latest offering is 88 minutes of heart-shaking romance bathed in sleek monochrome and wrapped up in a slinky jazz score. Cold War follows a tumultuous love story between two people of different backgrounds and temperaments – who despite their overwhelming passion for each other, are fatefully mismatched. If you are one of the many fans of his 2015 Oscar- winning Ida, Cold War works as a companion piece to this, continuing Pawlikowski’s commitment to exploring the dark heart of Poland and how its 20th century political wounds and unrest echoed through the emotional lives of the people.

If you missed the preview and satellite Q&A of Yardie with Idris Elba last week, you don’t have too long to wait for his directorial debut to hit the screens - it’s out this Friday! When a young boy named Denis witnesses the murder of his older brother at a peaceful gathering of warring factions, it sets him on a long trail of vengeance that spans from Jamaica all the way to London. Based on Jamaican-born British writer Victor Headley’s boundary-breaking novel, Yardie is a pounding gangster thriller that’s driven by the beat of a hand-picked soundtrack of vintage soul, reggae and dancehall cuts.

Catapulting us right back to the 21 st century, the new season of National Theatre Live screenings launches next week with Julie on Thursday 6th September. Award-winning playwright Polly Stenham’s adaptation of August Strindberg’s Miss Julie moves the drama from 19 th century Sweden to present day London. Vanessa Kirby (The Crown, Mission Impossible: Fallout) stars in the title role as the daughter of a wealthy tycoon throwing a birthday party at her father’s townhouse. Wild and newly single, Julie pursues escape in the form of Jean, a chauffeur who works for her dad, who is away from the party, cleaning up in the basement with his fiancée. The play spirals into a sprawling journey through social class, sexism, racism, mental health and just about everything to do with life, love and being human. It’s provocative, profound and not for the faint-hearted. A great mix to get stuck into this week, with plenty more of our favourites coming up over the next month, as well as a season of films by the wondrously vibrant visionary, Agnès Varda. We can’t wait!