Favourite Things: “Theatre Deli is one of the city’s best kept secrets”

Oz Billings at the Green Bean Cafe.
Oz Billings at the Green Bean Cafe.

A man that changed the face of policing in Sheffield now has the same sense of ambition for the housing market at the east side of the city. Oz Billings enjoyed an illustrious law enforcement career that started way back in 1984 when he joined the local force at Hammerton Road as a constable. He served in a number of uniformed and non-uniformed roles and took part in major operations to reduce violent crime and clampdown on illegal drug activity. He was promoted to sergeant in 1992.

Oz Billings spent 21 years with South Yorkshire Police - when he left he was chief inspector of operations in Barnsley and he’d become a leading light in the Black Police Association.

But even though he rose even further through the ranks to become a Superintendent in Merseyside he had another burning passion in his life - property.

These days Oz Billings is the face of EweMove estate agents in the Anston and Dinnington area of Sheffield.

The estate agent and rising star of the company specialises in sales, lettings and sourcing individual properties for buyers – he was even featured in HGTV’s top rating House Hunters International recently. 

He said: “Some might think it was an unusual move but for me it’s perfect. I’ve always been very much a ‘people person’ and selling a house is a very personal thing. EweMove are rated the most trusted estate agent in the whole country according Trustpilot and our Sheffield team have the most 5 star reviews across our company – it couldn’t be a better fit.”

Oz Billings is married and lives in Dinnington. You can find more about him at: https://www.ewemove.com/estate-agents/anston/ 

Theatre Deli

This is undoubtedly one of Sheffield’s best kept secrets. It is an arts centre with a difference. Though it is housed in the sprawling, former Mothercare building on Eyre Street bang next door to Staples, it retains more than an air of intrigue with passers by still wondering what on earth goes on inside. It contains the Deli Bar and an array of regular performances with an emphasis on helping people make art for themselves.

Beehive Pub, Harthill 

Few country pubs have the welcoming nature of this place. Recently refurbished, the Beehive is a firm favourite of mine. It’s a great place for classic pub food with everything locally sourced. It has been a country pub for over 150 years with a décor that cleverly mixes modern with traditional. Greenbean café at the Green Scene Garden Centre – This café is not your ordinary garden centre café. Think table service, exquisite dishes and excellent Trip Advisor reviews. People drive from miles around to sample their renowned menu!

Chez Lahlou, Walkley

The French restaurant has been serving up the best of Paris since 1989. The servings are ample and the prices are very reasonable. Everything from frogs’ legs to snails are on the menu. Small, homely and genuinely welcoming. If you’ve not tried it, I’d suggest you pay them a visit.

Kelham Island

It’s still hard to comprehend the incredible transformation of the Kelham Island area in recent years. The proliferation of quality accommodation, restaurants, bars and more has been quite mind blowing. And it doesn’t show any sign of stopping.

Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet

Few places display Sheffield’s industrial beginnings better than the breathtaking Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet. It is undoubtedly one of the city’s key cultural attractions.

Sheffield Cathedral

It may not be the most illustrious cathedral in the country, but it’s said to be amongst the best preserved. The site previously played host to the Sheffield Cross, a 9th century feature with a shaft of the cross now featuring in the British Museum. The basis of the current cathedral was believed to have been constructed in 1430.

There have been many changes, developments and refurbishments in the intervening years but there are stones in the east end of the church which date back to the 13th century and the chancel roof is said to date back to the 16th century.